GODS BEHAVING BADLY BOOK

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Gods Behaving Badly book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Being a Greek god is not all it once was. Yes, the twelve go. Gods Behaving Badly: A Novel [Marie Phillips] on unulelteoco.ml *FREE* Sold by: "THE BOOK TREASURY" - Daily Shipping from Nashville, TN! Add to Cart. Gods Behaving Badly is a novel by the British author Marie Phillips. It was first published by Jonathan Cape in Set in London, it tells the tale of the twelve gods of Mount Olympus living in a rundown flat as their powers wane. It has been selected for The Atlantic's 1Book Twitter book club's book of.


Gods Behaving Badly Book

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A tree meets a dog walker at the start of “Gods Behaving Badly,” Marie Phillips's flossy, high-concept comic novel. “I'm Kate,” the tree says. Such deference, a holdover perhaps from the days of the Hays Code, is entirely lacking in Marie Phillips's first novel, “Gods Behaving Badly,” in. The characters in Gods Behaving Badly are either beautiful or brainy. Do you think this is an accurate description of the book? How important is each quality to .

It was too depressing.

Things had all been so much easier in the years that they were now obliged to refer to as BC. Each of them should be channelling their dwindling power into discovering precisely why their power is dwindling, but minor irritations and family squabbles always intercede.

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A good cleaner in north London is a rare find, for example, and so when Apollo tricks Zeus into killing the housekeeper that Artemis hired, a hero must be found to retrieve her from the Underworld beneath Angel Tube station. It is a significant challenge for a novel to live up to a clever concept, even more so when the novelist in question has been feted for months as the Next Big Thing, the toast of last year's Frankfurt Book Fair after she was discovered, working in an independent bookshop, by a Waterstone's downloader.

But in the case of Marie Phillips, it is deserving of the hype.

She has done a spectacular job - funny and unpretentious, witty and readable, Gods Behaving Badly lives up to all its potential. University life in Seventies Brighton provides a confusing array of sexual choice and opportunity, and her set texts become instruction manuals as she navigates the very real and immediate challenges of tumbling accidentally into adulthood.

This is a tender portrait of a feisty little girl lost, living with her older boyfriend, sleeping with her innocent tutorial partner and looking for the answers in Heidegger and Kierkegaard. Even with the salaries brought in by Aphrodite's sex lines and the bar that Dionysus runs, these days it's a struggle to stay afloat.

Parliament Hill is a far cry from Mount Olympus, and Apollo in particular is galled by their change of circumstances. It was too depressing. Things had all been so much easier in the years that they were now obliged to refer to as BC.

A good cleaner in north London is a rare find, for example, and so when Apollo tricks Zeus into killing the housekeeper that Artemis hired, a hero must be found to retrieve her from the Underworld beneath Angel Tube station.

It is a significant challenge for a novel to live up to a clever concept, even more so when the novelist in question has been feted for months as the Next Big Thing, the toast of last year's Frankfurt Book Fair after she was discovered, working in an independent bookshop, by a Waterstone's downloader.

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But in the case of Marie Phillips, it is deserving of the hype. Gods Behaving Badly is much more fun than it has any right to be.

But for the most part her nonchalant transposition of the ancients into post-postmodern life is seamless, amusing and blessedly unpretentious. But in the case of Marie Phillips, it is deserving of the hype.

Gods Behaving Badly: a novel

She has done a spectacular job -- funny and unpretentious, witty and readable, Gods Behaving Badly lives up to all its potential. The result of all this truculent childishness is a fast-paced, slapstick story that also manages to illuminate some bittersweet benefits and drawbacks to both sides of the immortality issue, as the plot yaws from a send-up of Alice in Wonderland and Dorothy in Oz to a new twist on the tragic early Hellenic myths of Orpheus and Eurydice.

Beneath the comedy of ancient deities let loose in the modern world lurks a cosiness about human love and relationships that, at odds with the profoundly unsentimental myths she is reworking, would have been laughed off Olympus in the good old days. The cleverness is that Phillips does with Zeus, Aphrodite, Apollo et al precisely what the Greeks did with them.

They become many-times-magnified versions of us. Immortals were all about the trouble with mortality, after all.

By the end of nearly pages in Gods Behaving Badly, the jokes are not working as freshly or unexpectedly as they did at the start, but in many respects Marie Phillips is an amusing match for the ancient satirist.

The key is to fly through a book like this very fast -- on Hermes' wings.Much has been made of the fact that Taylor - and her heroine, also named Katherine Taylor - did bar work in New York and, among other lists, she has included a catalogue of stingy celebrity tippers unofficially compiled by the city's service industry. Aphrodite, the goddess of Need a good laugh?

Raunchy behavior and language abound, so don't say you weren't warned, but aside from that Marie Phillips has written a thoroughly delightful tale that evokes both laughter and fond memories of your humanities professor. Would you have chosen other jobs?

Original Title. A hilarious quest for love and acceptance!

Amy That would be Neil. Artemis, Hera, Hermes and even Zeus all make appearances and manage to contribute to the mayhem.